CGIAR-CSI at ESRI User Conference

Photo by Henry Juárez, CIP

Photo by Henry Juárez, CIP

During the week of July 14 – 18, 2014 the CGIAR-CSI representatives came together in San Diego, California to be part of the ESRI (Environmental Systems Research Institute) User Conference. The conference gathered over 16.000 participants to share their common interest in maps, data, remote sensing and the latest GIS technologies.

CSI members across 7 CGIAR Research Centers attended the conference to present research results: David Brown from Bioversity, Bernardo Creamer, Elizabeth Barona, Ernesto Girón, Glenn Graham Hyman, Jorge Cardona and Silvia Elena Castaño from CIAT (International Center for Tropical Agriculture), Kai Sonder from CIMMYT (International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center), Henry Juárez from CIP (International Potato Center), Maria Comanescu and Ulrike Wood-Sichra from IFPRI (International Food Policy Research Institute), Tunrayo Alabi from IITA (International Institute of Tropical Agriculture), and Ameer Rajah and Kiran Chandrasekharan from IWMI (International Water Management Institute).

We were treated to very inspiring speeches:
• Jack Dangermond’s opening remarks: http://video.esri.com/watch/3645/recognizing-your-work
• Global Polio Initiative’s use of the power of GIS to make polio history: http://video.esri.com/watch/3666/global-polio-eradication-initiative
• Kathryn D. Sullivan’s, the first American woman to walk in space: http://video.esri.com/watch/3674/bringing-science-to-life
• Mapping the City of Minneapolis: http://video.esri.com/watch/3647/mapit-minneapolis-casting-a-wider-net-in-the-city-of-lakes
• and many, many others: http://video.esri.com/channel/0/latest

Since we, the members of CSI (Consortium of Spatial Information) share the love for maps and see the value added of information delivered through maps, we prepared presentations of our research: The RTB (Roots Tubers & Bananas) team showcased their work in a series of presentations on crop distribution, and abiotic and biotic constraints to production of roots, tubers and bananas: http://www.rtb.cgiar.org/rtb-gis-initiative-promotes-open-data/. The IFPRI team presented the HarvestChoice program and one of its most important GIS tool – Mappr. HarvestChoice’s purpose is to collect and assemble biophysical, agricultural, socio-economic, and market access data and help investors, policymakers and program managers to make better and more informed decisions in Africa South of Sahara.

We are always excited to be part of such an important event which brings together people from all over the world sharing a special interest – to make the world a better place using maps.

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