Tag Archives: CIAT

The New Atlas of Crop Production Constraints and Opportunities

With a wide view of the future where plant breeders have the tools to breed crops in marginal environments with greater efficiency and accuracy for the benefit of the resource-poor farmers and their families, the Generation Challenge Programme (GCP) has carried out a broad access and proactive distribution platform as a consolidated vehicle for dissemination of knowledge, tools and services around crops breeding. The Integrated Breeding Platform (IBP) is particularly intended to boost crop productivity and resilience for smallholders in marginal environments by facilitating access to cutting-edge breeding technologies and informatics tools hitherto unavailable to developing-country breeder.

One of the useful informatics tools is called “Generation Atlas”, a GIS-based web mapping tool that allows researchers, policy analysts, students and others interested in crop improvement to explore constraints and opportunities of agricultural production throughout the world.

The new IBP Generation Atlas is a comprehensive compilation of online maps and geo-processing tools that use a combination of Google and ArcGIS Server technologies, integrated with databases like Google Fusion Tables synchronized with IFPRI and CIAT relational database management systems (RDBMS) to provide access to trial sites information from AgTrials, the Global Agricultural Trial Repository initiative, historical climate data, WorldClim data, generic soil profiles, soils from various sources and many more valuable information from HarvestChoice.

The web map about shows farming systems and trial sites from AgTrials repository. You can explore the map using your mouse, clicking on the red points or just go to the Atlas for visualizing more map layers and useful information such as weather stations, climate, global crop distribution, planting date, soils, soil constraints, seasonal drought index, failed season, population, percentage of children less than 5 yrs old stunted, phenotyping field sites, among others.

For further information you can contact to Glenn Hyman at CIAT or leave us a comment.

Try IBP Generation Atlas

RTB Workshop at CIAT in Cali, Colombia

Cross-posted on CIAT’s DAPA Blog

RTB (Roots, Tubers and Bananas) Workshop was held at CIAT‘s headquarters in Cali, Colombia on 12-14 November 2012.

We have 19 people from IITA, CIAT, CIP and Bioversity. One of our objectives is to test out cloud technology for sharing geographic information. We are using resources from the CGIAR Consortium for Spatial Information’s (CSI)  agreement with Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI). The technology is ArcGIS Online. The four CGIAR centers are pooling together their data and putting it in ArcGIS Online. Here below is a map of irrigated areas from the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) overlaid on a maps of John Dixon’s Farming Systems map. Use your mouse to pan and zoom around the maps. Note you can pan to different parts of the world. This blog post is calling the ArcGIS Online system and data stored on the cloud.

So far, we are quite pleased with the drawing speeds. We did have some difficulty getting everyone signed on to the system, but we did manage to do with only a 25 minute delay in our agenda. Today we are discussing input data into a multi-criteria evaluation process. Tomorrow, we split up into group according to crop, and begin thinking about the geographic dimension of RTB priorities.

For further information about the CSI geospatial platform initially used to support RTB project and soon more CGIAR CRPs, please contact your GIS Team in each center or leave us a comment here to follow up and help you anytime.

CGIAR-CSI at ArcGIS.com CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers, and Bananas (RTB) Decision and Policy Analysis (DAPA) – a CIAT blog

Tortillas on the Roaster Project

GIS based analysis on impact of climate change on maize bean systems in Central America done by CSI members:

Higher temperatures and changes in rainfall patterns could transform the agricultural landscape of Central America, threatening the livelihoods of one million maize and bean farmers, according to a pioneering report released today that for the first time takes a specific look at the impact of climate change on a local level.

Download full report from the CRS website